Devastating Contradiction In #Benghazi Security Chief Dylan Davies’s Accounts

Devastating Contradiction In #Benghazi Security Chief Dylan Davies’s Accounts

The Benghazi scandal is real. 

The Obama administration and groups like Media Matters for America would like to use Dylan Davies to smear the entire story as a hoax. As if the four bodies and charred remains of the consulate compound weren’t real. As if mountains of well sourced evidence wasn’t available.

We know this much. On September 11th,  2012 Al Qaeda terrorists who were part of Ansar al Sharia Brigades launched a coordinated attack on a woefully insecure U.S. diplomatic compound in Benghazi that served as a front for a secret CIA operation that involved collecting weapons. The Obama administration knew  and hid this information from the American people until after the Presidential election. 

That’s a scandal. It’s about six scandals rolled into one. Nothing Dylan Davies said changes that.

That being said, this is the most devastating evidence I’ve seen that Dylan Davies lied in his book The Embassy House.

Until now, the claim that Davies was lying was based on unseen FBI reports supplied by unnamed sources. Most people have accepted this as proof he was lying but nobody’s really seen the reports

However, comparing the Incident Report that The Daily Beast reported on on November 2nd with Dylan Davies’s own book revealing a huge inconsistency.

Two publicly available documents. Two completely different stories.

As has been reported before, in the book Davies says he personally went to the hospital the night of the attack. In the incident report, Davies learns info from someone who’s been to the hospital.

Two different stories but which is true?

The devil is in the details.

In the incident report, while describing what he’d learned from someone who’d been to hospital, the report says that the Managing Director was not told about the death of Ambassador Stevens:

I phoned my Managing Director and told him what I’d seen as I trust him implicitly, and I knew he would not pass this information on. However I kept quiet about the Ambassadors death as I knew there would be huge repercussions.

Since the Incident Report came from Blue Mountain and it was an important matter, I assume that the Managing Director saw the report.

Therefore, I assume that Davies did not, in fact, tell him about Steven’s death at that time.

Otherwise, Blue Mountain submitted a report with a knowingly false statement about a more or less irrellevant detail. It wouldn’t matter if Davies had told his boss Stevens was dead. There’s no discernable reason to lie about it.

However, in the book The Embassy House, Dylan Davies not only says that he told the Managing Director about Steven’s death but there’s an entire dramatic conversation about it where he tells him about the death, emphasizes it, is asked whether he’s sure and then confirms it again. This is from page 216-217:

I did the only thing I could think of: I pulled out my phone and called Robert. He was my boss, but more important, he was a father figure and a man of unrivaled experience. Plus I knew we could converse in Welsh, so that if anyone was listening in they wouldn’t have a clue what we were on about.

“Listen, it is one hundred percent confirmed that Ambassador Stevens is dead,” I blurted out, just as soon as he’d answered. “The U.S. ambassador has been killed.”

It took a lot to shock a man such as him, but all there was now was a ringing silence on the other end of the line. “Are you absolutely fucking certain?” he asked, eventually. He seemed unable or unwilling to believe it.

“One hundred percent certain.”

Those stories couldn’t be more different and they directly involve another person who could clarify this; the Managing Director of the Blue Mountain Group.

I phoned Blue Mountain and cut me off before I was even able to ask a question. They were polite, though.

Below : the relevant sections of the Incident Report and the book The Embassy House.

Incident Report

[note note_color=”#66d6ff” radius=”10″]

At 0200hrs, I received a call from (REDACTED) who was at the hospital. He said that he had been shot in the leg but he would survive. He then said that he had some really alarming news for me and would come to my villa to discuss. I said “just tell me on the phone” but he refused and told me that this news was too important.

On his arrival he said we- must speak in private. We went into another room, at which point he turned on his phone and showed me a photo of a dead man at the hospital. I knew instantly that the man was the US Ambassador. There did not appear to be any bruising, deformity or gunshot wounds to the body. The ambassador’s face was black as were his teeth so I thought he must died from smoke inhalation, I could not confirm this however.

(REDACTED) then received a call from a doctor at the hospital demanding the name of the dead American. I told the doctor that I’d never seen the man before and didn’t know his nane; the doctor became irate so I put the phone down.

(REDACTED) had learned that the ambassador had been taken to the hospital by a group of Libyan men and that he was alive on arrival but later passed away. I asked if any other Americans were at the hospital he said yes, a black man who had been shot in the hand. I presumed that this was one of the Ambassadors close protection team as both men were black.

At this stage I feared the worst for the remaining Americans at the compound. I phoned my Managing Director and told him what I’d seen as I trust him implicitly, and I knew he would not pass this information on. However I kept quiet about the Ambassadors death as I knew there would be huge repercussions.

[/note]

From The Embassy House

[note note_color=”#c4ff66″ radius=”10″]

I glanced at my watch: it was just after 2: 00 A.M. Libya time, 8: 00 P.M. in Washington D.C. The dead man was J. Christopher Stevens, the American ambassador to Libya. Ambassador Stevens was a man who had spoken fluent Arabic and who loved this part of the world and its people. He was a man who had done so much to bring the U.S. administration over to support the Libyan rebels, as they had battled Gaddafi loyalist forces. And this was the thanks he had got— to be burned to death and left in some shitty Libyan hospital, alongside those who had killed him.

I had never felt so angry or enraged in my life. I was burning up inside. I didn’t know what to do. It was the worst moment of my entire life.

I was beyond reason. I did the only thing I could think of: I pulled out my phone and called Robert. He was my boss, but more important, he was a father figure and a man of unrivaled experience. Plus I knew we could converse in Welsh, so that if anyone was listening in they wouldn’t have a clue what we were on about.

“Listen, it is one hundred percent confirmed that Ambassador Stevens is dead,” I blurted out, just as soon as he’d answered. “The U.S. ambassador has been killed.”

It took a lot to shock a man such as him, but all there was now was a ringing silence on the other end of the line. “Are you absolutely fucking certain?” he asked, eventually. He seemed unable or unwilling to believe it.

“One hundred percent certain.”

I told him we had the photo to prove it, and that I’d send it on from Zahid’s phone. Silence again. Then: “What about all the other Americans?” “I figure they’ve all got to be dead. I can’t get hold of anyone. The main man is dead. Surely, that must mean all of them are dead. They’d have fought to protect him to the last man  .  .  .”

“Right, you’ve got to make a run for it,” Robert told me. “If you don’t hear anything either way within thirty minutes get the hell out. Stay in the villa in the meantime, stay calm, but be ready to run. Let’s see how things unfold in the next thirty mins, okay?” “Yeah. Okay.”

Robert presumed I was still in the villa. I’d chosen not to tell him that I was in a car with two of my guards driving away from the hospital. And I didn’t tell him that lying low was the last thing I had in mind.

Jones, Morgan; Lewis, Damien (2013-10-29). The Embassy House: The Explosive Eyewitness Account of the Libyan Embassy Siege by the Soldier Who Was There (pp. 216-217). Threshold Editions. Kindle Edition. 

[/note]
Lara Logan Lied About Dylan Davies In Her 60 Minutes #Benghazi Apology

Lara Logan Lied About Dylan Davies In Her 60 Minutes #Benghazi Apology

Logan said:

After our report aired, questions arose about whether his account was true when an incident report surfaced. It told a different story about what he did the night of the attack. Davies denied having anything to do with that incident report and insisted that the story he told us was not only accurate it was the same story that he told the FBI when they interviewed him.

It’s not true that Davies denied having anything to do with the incident report.

As far as I know, the only interview Davies has done since the allegations of lying broke was with the Daily Beast in their November 2nd story Here’s what that the Daily Beast published eight days ago:

In his interview with The Daily Beast, Davies said the version of the events contained in the incident report matched what he told his supervisor, called “Robert” in his book, who is a top Blue Mountain Group executive. Davies said he lied to Robert about his actions that night because he did not want his supervisor to know he had disobeyed his orders to stay at his villa.

It’s entirely possible Davies lied in his book and on 60 Minutes.

That doesn’t justify Lara Logan and 60 Minutes lying about Dylan Davies.

#Benghazi Cover-Up:What’s In The 60 Minutes Segment They Don’t Want You To See?

#Benghazi Cover-Up:What’s In The 60 Minutes Segment They Don’t Want You To See?

The goal of Hillary Clinton aligned Media Matters for America was to discredit the entire Benghazi story as “a hoax.”  They were helped along by nameless people in the FBI who disputed part of what Dylan Davies said in the 60 Minutes interview.

They got 60 Minutes to delete the entire segment. They got CBS News to issue an apology for the entire segment.

Even assuming that Dylan Davies lied about going to the compound  was the entire segment wrong?

How much of it was wrong? 

Was Dylan Davies the main interview subject?

See for yourself.

Before I reprint the entire transcript, here are some of the points raises in the story that are NOT disputed.

  • Contrary to the White House’s public statements, which were still being made a full week later, it’s now well established that the Americans were attacked by al Qaeda in a well-planned assault.
  • The black flags of al Qaeda flying openly in the streets
  • There were concerns about security forces in place at Embassy says Davies
  • Andy Wood is a top American security official quoted extensively. Says there were concerns.
  •  Al Qaeda stated intent to attack Red Cross, British and Americans in Benghazi
  • Al Qaeda made good; Wood told State Department and DOD
  • Wood raised security concerns directly with Amb. Stevens 3 monhts prior to attack “You are gonna get attacked. You are gonna get attacked in Benghazi. It’s gonna happen. You need to change your security profile.”
  • Wood: “Shut down operations. Move out temporarily. Ch– or change locations within the city.”
  • Senior al Qaeda leader Abu Anas al-Libi was in Libya, tasked by the head of al Qaeda to establish a clandestine terrorist network inside the country
  • Greg Hicks — Steven’s deputy “That was a frightening piece of information”
  • Hicks’s third request for more security was not allowed to go forward and he doesn’t know why
  • Amb. Stevens approved a series of detailed cables to Washington, specifically mentioning, among other things, “the al Qaeda flag has been spotted several times flying over government buildings”.
  • Embassy is attacked. Jones says guards told him “We’re here to kill Americans, not Libyans,”
  • Quick reaction force from the CIA Annex ignored orders to wait and raced to the compound and repelled a force of as many as 60 armed terrorists and managed to save five American lives and recover the body of Foreign Service Officer Sean Smith
  • The same force that had gone to the compound was now defending the CIA Annex. Hours later, they were joined by a small team of Americans from Tripoli.
  • Wood: attack required “Coordination, planning, training, experienced personnel. They practice those things. They knew what they were doing. That was a– that was a well-executed attack.”
  • Two Delta Force operators who fought at the Annex and they’ve since been awarded the Distinguished Service Cross and the Navy Cros
  •  Hicks told no help coming “”Listen, you’ve gotta tell those guys there may not be any help coming.”
  • The U.S. government today acknowledges the Americans at the U.S. compound in Benghazi were not adequately protected
  • those who carried out the attack are still being hunted down.
  • ID of planners known
  • Al Qaeda has grown in power across Libya

Here’s the transcript. I’ve marked the disputed section in italics and a red background.

[divider top=”no”]

When Chris Stevens was killed in Benghazi, Libya, on the anniversary of September 11th last year, it was only the sixth time that the United States had lost an ambassador to its enemies. The events of that night have been overshadowed by misinformation, confusion and intense partisanship. But for those who lived through it, there’s nothing confusing about what happened, and they share a sense of profound frustration because they say they saw it coming.

Tonight, you will hear for the first time from a security officer who witnessed the attack. He calls himself, Morgan Jones, a pseudonym he’s using for his own safety. A former British soldier, he’s been helping to keep U.S. diplomats and military leaders safe for the last decade.

[note note_color=”#fff1f0″ radius=”10″]On a night he describes as sheer hell, Morgan Jones snuck into a Benghazi hospital that was under the control of al Qaeda terrorists, desperate to find out if one of his close friends from the U.S. Special Mission was the American he’d been told was there.

Morgan Jones: I was dreading seeing who it was, you know? It didn’t take long to get to the room. And I could see in through the glass. And I didn’t even have to go into the room to see who it was. I knew who it was immediately.

Lara Logan: Who was it?

Morgan Jones: It was the ambassador, dead. Yeah, shocking.[/note]

Morgan Jones said he’d never felt so angry in his life. Only hours earlier, Amb. Chris Stevens had sought him out, concerned about the security at the U.S. Special Mission Compound where Morgan was in charge of the Libyan guard force.

Now, the ambassador was dead and the U.S. compound was engulfed in flames and overrun by dozens of heavily armed fighters.

Although the attack began here, the more organized assault unfolded about a mile across the city at a top secret CIA facility known as the Annex. It lasted more than seven hours and took four American lives.

Contrary to the White House’s public statements, which were still being made a full week later, it’s now well established that the Americans were attacked by al Qaeda in a well-planned assault.

Five months before that night, Morgan Jones first arrived in Benghazi, in eastern Libya about 400 miles from the capital, Tripoli.

He thought this would be an easy assignment compared to Afghanistan and Iraq. But on his first drive through Benghazi, he noticed the black flags of al Qaeda flying openly in the streets and he grew concerned about the guard forces as soon as he pulled up to the U.S. compound.

Morgan Jones: There was nobody there that we could see. And then we realized they were all inside drinking tea, laughing and joking.

Lara Logan: What did you think?

Morgan Jones: Instantly I thought we’re going to have to get rid of all these guys.

Morgan Jones’ job was training the unarmed guards who manned the compound’s gates. A second Libyan force — an armed militia hired by the State Department — was supposed to defend the compound in the event of an attack. Morgan had nothing to do with the militia, but they worried him so much, he could not keep quiet.

Morgan Jones: I was saying, “These guys are no good. You need to– you need to get ’em out of here.”

Lara Logan: You also kept saying, “If this place is attacked these guys are not going to stand and fight?”

Morgan Jones: Yeah. I used to say it all the time. Yeah, in the end I got quite bored of hearing my own voice saying it.

Andy Wood: We had one option: “Leave Benghazi or you will be killed.”

Green Beret Commander, Lieutenant Colonel Andy Wood, was one of the top American security officials in Libya. Based in Tripoli, he met with Amb. Stevens every day.

The last time he went to Benghazi was in June, just three months before the attack. While he was there, al Qaeda tried to assassinate the British ambassador. Wood says, to him, it came as no surprise because al Qaeda — using a familiar tactic — had stated their intent in an online posting, saying they would attack the Red Cross, the British and then the Americans in Benghazi.

Lara Logan: And you watched as they–

Andy Wood: As they did each one of those.

Lara Logan: –attacked the Red Cross and the British mission. And the only ones left–

Andy Wood: Were us. They made good on two out of the three promises. It was a matter of time till they captured the third one.

Lara Logan: And Washington was aware of that?

Andy Wood: They knew we monitored it. We included that in our reports to both State Department and DOD.

Andy Wood told us he raised his concerns directly with Amb. Stevens three months before the U.S. compound was overrun.

Andy Wood: I made it known in a country team meeting, “You are gonna get attacked. You are gonna get attacked in Benghazi. It’s gonna happen. You need to change your security profile.”

Lara Logan: Shut down–

Andy Wood: Shut down–

Lara Logan: –the special mission–

Andy Wood: –“Shut down operations. Move out temporarily. Ch– or change locations within the city. Do something to break up the profile because you are being targeted. They are– they are– they are watching you. The attack cycle is such that they’re in the final planning stages.”

Lara Logan: Wait a minute, you said, “They’re in the final planning stages of an attack on the American mission in Benghazi”?

Andy Wood: It was apparent to me that that was the case. Reading, reading all these other, ah, attacks that were occurring, I could see what they were staging up to, it was, it was obvious.

We have learned the U.S. already knew that this man, senior al Qaeda leader Abu Anas al-Libi was in Libya, tasked by the head of al Qaeda to establish a clandestine terrorist network inside the country. Al-Libi was already wanted for his role in bombing two U.S. embassies in Africa.

Greg Hicks: It was a frightening piece of information.

Lara Logan: Because it meant what?

Greg Hicks: It raised the stakes, changed the game.

Greg Hicks, who testified before Congress earlier this year, was Amb. Stevens’ deputy based in Tripoli – a 22-year veteran of the Foreign Service with an impeccable reputation.

Lara Logan: And in that environment you were asking for more security assets and you were not getting them?

Greg Hicks: That’s right.

Lara Logan: Did you fight that?

Greg Hicks: I was in the process of trying to frame a third request but it was not allowed to go forward.

Lara Logan: So why didn’t you get the help that you needed and that you asked for?

Greg Hicks: I really, really don’t know. I in fact would like to know that, the answer to that question.

In the months prior to the attack, Amb. Stevens approved a series of detailed cables to Washington, specifically mentioning, among other things, “the al Qaeda flag has been spotted several times flying over government buildings”.

When the attack began on the evening of September 11, Amb. Stevens immediately called Greg Hicks, who was back in Tripoli.

Greg Hicks: Ambassador said that the consulate’s under attack. And then the line cut.

Lara Logan: Do you remember the sound of his voice?

Greg Hicks: Oh yeah, it’s indelibly imprinted on my mind.

Lara Logan: How did he sound?

Greg Hicks: He sounded frightened.

In Benghazi, Morgan Jones, who was at his apartment about 15 minutes away, got a frantic call from one of his Libyan guards.

Morgan Jones: I could hear gunshots. And I– and he said, “There’s– there’s men coming into the mission.” His voice, he was, he was scared, you could tell he was really scared and he was running, I could tell he was running.

His first thought was for his American friends, the State Department agents who were pinned down inside the compound, and he couldn’t believe it when one of them answered his phone.

Morgan Jones: I said, “What’s going on?” He said, “We’re getting attacked.” And I said, “How many?” And he said, “They’re all over the compound.” And I felt shocked, I didn’t know what to say. And– I said, “Well, just keep fighting. I’m on my way.”

Morgan’s guards told him the armed Libyan militia that was supposed to defend the compound had fled, just as Morgan had predicted. His guards — unarmed and terrified — sounded the alarm, but they were instantly overwhelmed by the attackers.

Morgan Jones: They said, “We’re here to kill Americans, not Libyans,” so they’d give them a good beating, pistol whip them, beat them with their rifles and let them go.

Lara Logan: We’re here to kill Americans.

Morgan Jones: That’s what they said, yeah.

Lara Logan: Not Libyans.

Morgan Jones: Yeah.

About 30 minutes into the attack, a quick reaction force from the CIA Annex ignored orders to wait and raced to the compound, at times running and shooting their way through the streets just to get there. Inside the compound, they repelled a force of as many as 60 armed terrorists and managed to save five American lives and recover the body of Foreign Service Officer Sean Smith. They were forced to fight their way out before they could find the ambassador.

[note note_color=”#fff1f0″ radius=”10″] Not long afterwards, Morgan Jones scaled the 12-foot high wall of the compound that was still overrun with al Qaeda fighters.

Morgan Jones: One guy saw me. He just shouted. I couldn’t believe that he’d seen me ’cause it was so dark. He started walking towards me.

Lara Logan: And as he was coming closer?

Morgan Jones: As I got closer, I just hit him with the butt of the rifle in the face.

Lara Logan: And?

Morgan Jones: Oh, he went down, yeah.

Lara Logan: He dropped?

Morgan Jones: Yeah, like– like a stone.

Lara Logan: With his face smashed in?

Morgan Jones: Yeah.

Lara Logan: And no one saw you do it?

Morgan Jones: No.

Lara Logan: Or heard it?

Morgan Jones: No, there was too much noise.
[/note] The same force that had gone to the compound was now defending the CIA Annex. Hours later, they were joined by a small team of Americans from Tripoli. From defensive positions on these rooftops, the Americans fought back a professional enemy. In a final wave of intense fighting just after 5 a.m., the attackers unleashed a barrage of mortars. Three of them slammed into this roof, killing former Navy SEALs Tyrone Woods and Glen Doherty.

Lara Logan: They hit that roof three times.

Andy Wood: They, they hit those roofs three times.

Lara Logan: In the dark.

Andy Wood: Yea, that’s getting the basketball through the hoop over your shoulder.

Lara Logan: What does it take to pull off an attack like that?

Andy Wood: Coordination, planning, training, experienced personnel. They practice those things. They knew what they were doing. That was a– that was a well-executed attack.

We have learned there were two Delta Force operators who fought at the Annex and they’ve since been awarded the Distinguished Service Cross and the Navy Cross — two of the military’s highest honors. The Americans who rushed to help that night went without asking for permission and the lingering question is why no larger military response ever crossed the border into Libya — something Greg Hicks realized wasn’t going to happen just an hour into the attack.

Lara Logan: You have this conversation with the defense attache. You ask him what military assets are on their way. And he says–

Greg Hicks: Effectively, they’re not. And I– for a moment, I just felt lost. I just couldn’t believe the answer. And then I made the call to the Annex chief, and I told him, “Listen, you’ve gotta tell those guys there may not be any help coming.”

Lara Logan: That’s a tough thing to understand. Why?

Greg Hicks: It just is. We–, for us, for the people that go out onto the edge, to represent our country, we believe that if we get in trouble, they’re coming to get us. That our back is covered. To hear that it’s not, it’s a terrible, terrible experience.

The U.S. government today acknowledges the Americans at the U.S. compound in Benghazi were not adequately protected. And says those who carried out the attack are still being hunted down.

Just a few weeks ago, Abu Anas al-Libi was captured for his role in the Africa bombings and the U.S. is still investigating what part he may have played in Benghazi. We’ve learned that this man, Sufian bin Qumu, a former Guantanamo Bay detainee and long-time al Qaeda operative, was one of the lead planners along with Faraj al-Chalabi, whose ties to Osama bin Laden go back more than 15 years. He’s believed to have carried documents from the compound to the head of al Qaeda in Pakistan.

The morning after the attack, Morgan Jones went back to the compound one last time to document the scene. He took these photos which he gave to the FBI and has published in a book he has written. After all this time, he told us he’s still haunted by a conversation he had with Foreign Service Officer Sean Smith, a week before the attack.

Morgan Jones: Yeah, he was worried. He wasn’t happy with the security.

Lara Logan: And you didn’t tell him all your worries?

Morgan Jones: No. No, didn’t want to–

Lara Logan: Why not?

Morgan Jones: I didn’t want to worry him anymore, you know? He’s a nice guy. I sort of promised him he’d be OK.

Lara Logan: You think about that?

Morgan Jones: Every day, yeah.

The U.S. pulled out of Benghazi and al Qaeda has grown in power across Libya. When a member of our team went to the U.S. compound earlier this month, he found remnants of the Americans’ final frantic moments still scattered on the ground. Among them Amb. Stevens’ official schedule for Sept.12, 2012, a day he didn’t live to see.

Statement from Damien Lewis, Co-Author Of The Embassy House, On Dylan Davies

Statement from Damien Lewis, Co-Author Of The Embassy House, On Dylan Davies

I just got the following in an email from Damien Lewis, the writer and journalist who wrote The Embassy House with Dylan Davies. The book has been pulled from publication after unnamed Obama administration officials disputed Mr. Davie’s account of visiting the compound and hospital in his book and on 60 Minutes.

Mr. Lewis said:

Right now I’m only able to put out this statement:

If there are inconsistencies in the events as told in The Embassy House and Mr. Davies’s previous renderings of the story, Mr. Davies needs to answer those inconsistencies. Those who were injured on the night of Benghazi 9/11 deserve to know the truth, as do the families of those who lost their lives.

Damien Lewis

At this point, nothing else is disputed in the 320 page book except Mr. Davies’s claim of visiting the compound and hospital. No specifics have been given yet from Obama administration officials.

#Benghazi: Did Congress Have Access To Dylan Davie’s FBI Testimony?

#Benghazi: Did Congress Have Access To Dylan Davie’s FBI Testimony?

An apology by CBS, a retraction of the entire 60 Minutes segment a pulled book — but as of right now, it’s all based on a refutation by unnamed FBI sources.

The major unanswered question as of right now (the evening of November 8th) about CBS’s retraction of the the Dylan Davies 60 Minutes piece and Simon & Shuster pulling his book The Embassy House is this : what is the FBI saying that Davies told them?

I found a November 6th Daily Beast article by Eli Lake called CIA Contractor Testimony Could Undermine Obama on Benghazi.

The whole thing is worth a read but this paragraph jumped out at me:

Congressional officials have told The Daily Beast that the House committee has reviewed transcripts of interviews the FBI conducted with all the eyewitnesses at Benghazi after the attacks. Earlier this year, the committee held closed sessions with CIA officers stationed at the Benghazi CIA annex and diplomatic security officers who were on the ground that evening. In his letter to Boehner, Nunes singles out Rep. Mike Rogers, the committee’s chairman, and its ranking Democrat for their leadership of a “non-political, efficient, and bipartisan investigative process.”

If the House Committee reviewed transcripts of all interviews the FBI conducted, that would include the interview that they did with Davies, right?

And that means that during the last week of controversy, some Congressmen were privy to the that testimony, right?

This could answer some questions.

By the way, Eli Lake at the Daily Beast is one of the reporters who did actually tracked down Benghazi whistleblower Dylan Davies for a November 2nd piece that got Davies on record for his side of the story.