The Horrible Lacey Act & The Gibson Guitar Raids

By now, you’ve probably heard a bit about the Obama DOJ’s two raids on iconic American manufacturer Gibson Guitars. The story has made headlines around the world as another shocking example of how far the current administration is willing to take their antipathy for successful businesses. If you need to get caught up, the Bigs have broken news on this story, including two exclusive interviews with Gibson’s CEO (one by me and a must-hear interview by Dana Loesch) plus an important piece by John Nolte.

As much as the Obama Administration deserves scorn for their overzealous prosecution, I’ve been researching the background of this story and have found that there’s another culprit – the entire United States Congress and their passage of an amendment to The Lacey Act back in 2008 that’s a prime example of an awful, anti-business law done in the name of environmentalism.

When you learn the details of the Lacey Act Amendments I think you’ll agree that they need to repealed as soon as humanely possible.

The amendments were passed in 2008 as part of the behemoth omnibus Farm Bill. The problem they were trying to address was the deforestation in countries like Madagascar, where ‘exotic woods’ like rosewood and ebony come from. Some of these problems resulted from political instability in the country, which created a grey market for these woods where the new ruling governments looked the other way and profited from the illegal wood harvest.

Where is all this wood going? Interestingly, 95% of it is going to China – not for re-export but for domestic use. The wealthy in China love rosewood and ebony furniture. In fact, the next time you hear a liberal attack the Koch Brothers or whatever rich-person-of-the-moment that they want to attack, picture someone in China who sleeps in an $800,000 bed. That’s not a misprint – if you want to see a picture of what a nearly million dollar bed looks like, you might want to check out this stylish report – it’s on Page 11. There’s a million dollar Chinese bed on page 16, too. And the report makes mention of the first Gibson raid on page 9.

So how have papers like The New York Times reported on this? Do you think they might possibly use misleading or even blatantly false reporting to try and guilt out their environmentally hip urban left wing readership? This is from a 2010 article on their ‘Green Blog’…

..it is not only the Chinese who covet the rich look of rosewood. Much of the furniture gets exported to the United States and Europe. Some of it appears in the polished contours of beautiful guitars.

Let’s parse those three short sentences.

It’s true – it’s not ONLY the Chinese who like rosewood. They are only responsible for a mere 95% of it. And when the Times says ‘much of the furniture’ gets exported to the U.S. and Europe…well, that’s not at all what the report says. Go look at top of Page 5, which uses the phrase ‘small quantities’. And to finish – they mention guitars. You know, guitars like the ones Gibson makes.

So, we have the New York Times providing false ideological cover and justification for the Lacey Act amendments and their enforcement. The goal is to create a smokescreen of false equivalence when, in fact, this is almost exclusively a problem caused by the Chinese – and China doesn’t seem to have passed any laws or made any agreements related to this issue at all. I looked and I couldn’t find any.

Meanwhile, the United States Congress passed Amendments to the Lacey Act to put the hammer down on whatever small part of the 5% that anyone in the United Starts is responsible for. If the penalties weren’t so draconian it would be another laughable example totally ineffective environmental symbolism. Remember, even if the U.S. were to stop every single import of rosewood, it wouldn’t actually solve whatever problem may exist in Madagascar at all.

How bad are the Lacey Act Amendments?

While China does nothing, the U.S. Congress saw fit to punish U.s businesses with fines of $500,000 and jail sentences of 5 years. This can’t be emphasized enough because it’s a real human consequence – the Federal Government is on the verge of possibly putting the CEO of Gibson Guitars in prison and doing enough economic damage to shut down the company for good.

I’m not even mentioning the new bureaucracy and paperwork requirements. I’m not going into the fines of $100,000 and a year in prison for unknowingly violating the Lacey Act Amendments. I’m ignoring the cost to the taxpayers of this enforcement. You can read all about those disgusting elements in the cartoony Primer that your tax dollars paid for and you’ll see I’m not joking about the cartoons.

The consequences of this awful, ineffective law are no joke, either. It’s happening to Gibson Guitars right now. I don’t grant the government the facts for second; Gibson is innocent until proven guilty and they haven’t even been charged. But remember what’s at stake. A man might go to prison. People will lose their jobs. And the rosewood of Madagascar will still be sent to China to make $1,000,000 beds.

Unless…

Unless we do something about it. Unless we draw a line in the sand and say enough. Unless some politician or Presidential hopeful picks up on this as the perfect example of government versus U.S. business. Herman Cain? Rick Perry? Rep. Bachmann? Mitt Romney? Thad McCotter? Anyone?

41 Comments

  1. Um, the 2008 farm bill was signed by George W. Bush. What makes you think that another Republican is going to be an improvement? The idea that Obama is anti-business is laughable – the only reason we still have an automobile industry in the US is because of him, and no thanks to the Republicans in Congress who simply wanted to let it die. If only ideology were as simple as you make it out to be.

    Reply
    • It is screamingly funny reading this remark made two years ago! Boy, has history proven SAM wrong! (Not that he would dare admit it…)

      Reply
  2. @Sam

    What makes you think we still have an automobile industry in the US? It’s been dying for years, helped to its demise by UAW greed. Today it’s only on unlawful life support from the US government.

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  3. @Sam

    Your post suggests that you are a Democrat and an Obama supporter (not that there is anything wrong with that). I have a few questions for you:

    Do you think you did your cause any favor by sidestepping the essence of this article, i.e. a horrible U.S. law and its selective application by the federal government?

    Do you believe that the law should stays on the books and be applied as described?

    Do you believe that the President controls the DOJ?

    An answer to these questions will likely answer your own.

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  4. “And the rosewood of Madagascar will still be sent to China to make $1,000,000 beds.”

    Why ban ivory. They’re just going to kill the elephants anyway….

    Later on you can explain to your home-schooled kids that elephants disappeared because God wanted to shoot pool.

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  5. @TBogg

    Your ad hominem attack aside I appreciate that you are clearer than Sam.

    I assume from your post that you regard this to be a good law, you like the way it works and you support the way it is applied.

    Please correct me if I am wrong.

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  6. Oh gee, more right-wing boilerplate about how Obama is anti-business. Whatever. If there’s anything we’ve learned over the last few years it’s the total absurdity of claims of this nature. Instead we’re left with some lame, half-assed attempt to say, “Sure, this was already law well before Obama became President but it’s totally his fault anyway!” There are plenty of legitimate criticisms, and the fact that you’ve chosen to go after this non-issue instead of something that would show Obama’s true nature (because clearly this Gibson raid is a bigger story than pressuring Schneiderman, for instance) shows what you’re really about. Have fun with your new life as a right-wing propagandist Lee — you’re just as terrible at it as everything else you’ve done.

    ps. Wellington — I get that you think you’ve come up with some devastating intellectual argument that will leave left-wingers crying in submission, if only you can force them to address it. The fact that we’re ignoring it and laughing at you ought to tell you how potent it actually is.

    pps. Oh no, Tbogg used an ad hominem! That never happens! I bet he feels bad.

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  7. ppps. Tbogg did not actually use an ad hominem. Get a dictionary.

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  8. For all of your gumshoe reporting it doesn’t seem like you’ve actually read the affidavit. It clearly states that Gibson ordered a shipment of sawn logs then fraudulently listed them as fingerboards and concealed the final destination. And the CEO has the gall to claim he doesn’t know what he’s being charged with?! I know I shouldn’t be but I’m still amazed at how quickly you got co-opted into doing corporate PR as soon as the words “big government” were flashed as a bait.

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  9. @trizzlor — the affidavit is for a search warrant. It’s good stuff, but it’s not a criminal charge and it doesn’t contain evidence that has been presented in court: the alleged fraud led to the search warrant, but the “alleged” is still “alleged.”

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  10. @ou.uo: You’re right there, I should have specified that this is an allegation of fraud rather than proof of fraud. Still, it is an allegation that the Gibson CEO should certainly be aware of, and one that’s been omitted from any mention I’ve seen of the case in conservative circles.

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  11. “At the behest of Sen. Ron Wyden (D-Ore.), the 2008 Farm Bill included the ban by incorporating provisions of the Legal Timber Protection Act (H.R. 1497), sponsored by Rep. Earl Blumenauer (D-Ore.), and the Combat Illegal Logging Act (S. 1930), sponsored by Sen. Wyden.”

    “The illegal logging ban is a huge victory for conservation”

    I get the emotional connection here. But, did the US bill curtail exports to China from Madagascar? Isn’t it the same problem as trying to get the US to use less coal while China surpasses us in coal use and pollution?

    http://wwf.worldwildlife.org/site/PageServer?pagename=can_results_illegal_logging_imports

    FYI, Democrats controlled the House and Senate in 2008.

    “The 112th Congress likely will consider reauthorization of the 2008 farm bill (P.L. 110-246, Food,
    Conservation, and Energy Act of 2008) because much of the current law expires in 2012.”

    “The “farm bill” is renewed about every five years.2 The omnibus nature of the bill can create
    broad coalitions of support among sometimes conflicting interests for policies that individually
    might not survive the legislative process.”

    http://www.nationalaglawcenter.org/assets/crs/RS22131.pdf

    I suspect we’ll get this problem fixed in 2012 when Obama is gone and the Republican’s control both halves of Congress.

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  12. @StinkDaddy,
    FYI, since TBoggs referenced the fact that Lee homeschools his kids, and TBoggs did so in a way that implies that Lee’s children will be less than educated since Lee is one of their teachers, he did in fact attack Lee via ad hominem.

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  13. These Obamabots are hilarious.

    If its about the wood, where are the charges and the raids on Martin & Co guitars? They use the same wood and strangely, no charges, no raids, no nothing. Wait, Martin donated to the DNC while Gibson’s CEO donates to republicans? Surely, this isn’t a case of “rewarding our friends and punishing our enemies.”

    I hate playing the “if this were Bush” game, but Jesus, the hypocrisy never ends with you guys.

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  14. What a strange amendment in a farm bill. “Rural Urban housing” WTF?
    http://www.govtrack.us/congress/amendment.xpd?session=110&amdt=s3688

    This Farm Bill is bloated. “Obesity study” Amendment by Ted Kennedy.
    http://www.govtrack.us/congress/amendment.xpd?session=110&amdt=s3679

    Here’s the Logging amendment. http://www.govtrack.us/congress/amendment.xpd?session=110&amdt=s3698 It’s on the Regulation side where the real problem lies with this, no? The amendment is vague. How the regs are/were written is what I interpret to be the real issue affecting Gibson and other Guitar makers today. Who wrote the regs and how do we get that fixed to something more realistic to conservation and the needs of US business? Whaddaya say Cass baby? How about a little nudge to help Gibson?

    Regardless, it is no wonder Bush Vetoed it. This Farm Bill is a mess. http://www.govtrack.us/congress/bill.xpd?bill=h110-2419&tab=amendments

    You suck Washington.

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  15. Oh, stinkdaddy, do you always make such a jumbled mess from simple things?

    You have a weird idea of what is or isn’t intellectually devastating stuff. Why the drama, cupcake? It‘s just a few questions; you either like what’s happening to Gibson or not. Why would anyone think lefties need to cry themselves to sleep? Because someone “forced them to address” something? Heh.

    I just wanted to know what kind you are and you told me, that’s all.

    And since you started with this intellectual superiority thingy: Did it not occur to you how it’s going to look when you boast about ignoring me in a response addressed to me?

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  16. @mark, let me break it down since it sounds like you’ve walked into a fight after the players went home. The Fish & Wildlife Services alleges that Gibson committed fraud by misrepresenting to customs a shipment of “sawn logs” as “6mm fingerboards” and concealing the final destination of the shipment. Perhaps these were honest mistakes that just happened to benefit Gibson, and that’s what the investigation is intent on finding out. Martin & Co., on the other hand, know how to properly account for their shipments, have not misrepresented the raw materials they receive, and are therefore not under investigation.

    In the meantime, the CEO of Gibson (who donates to Democratic campaigns as well) has lied to you about the allegations and convinced you to go around mis-representing a case you’ve only heard about through an echo-chamber, without even bothering to read the primary documents. So who’s the partisan hack here?

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  17. @triz
    So then charges have been filed from the raid 2 years ago when they confiscated a million dollars of inventory? And if charges were never filed, then that merchandise was promptly returned, right?

    Now, as far as what the govt is alleging (because they would never lie about their motives), the govt, being the accuser, should press charges. The govt is not allowed to just raid factories multiple times seizing property over two years WITHOUT filing charges. That’s harassment at the very least.

    I’m not late to this party. This administrations DOJ is corrupt. But as long as people like you are there to go around misrepresenting the facts that you’ve only heard in an echo chamber.

    But I’m sure they’ll get around to charging Gibson right after they charge themselves for Fast and Furious.

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  18. Sure Obama is pro business. He’s pro any business that gives him money, pro BP, pro GE, pro Goldman Sachs, etc. That’s not capitalism though, that’s plain corruption, or more aptly fascism. (not that Bush was much better, he at least wasn’t a _blatant_ whore.)

    We didn’t save an automobile business. We created a welfare program for unions with a by product of producing a few cars. They can never compete in a free market, and will go under as soon as aunti sugar’s udders dry up.

    At least the teabaggers woke up and realized (finally) how bad Bush was, I’m not sure what is wrong with progressives’ brains that they don’t see that not only is Obama, Bush 2.0, he’s Bush^2. He is creating a new greater depression.

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  19. This is way too scary to turn into “he did it, no he did it.” We’re all going to get done. This mess makes us all liable for the actions of foreign exporters, it requires us to know every splinter of wood in everything we own if we want to transport it (that’s across state lines, kiddies) and if there are no records because it was made a long time ago, under the law as written, it can go into the Fish and Wildlife or Customs heaps and you’ll never see it again. Of course, there are different “guidelines” being used for enforcement, but it doesn’t change the fact that the language is in the law.

    The Lacey act can be used to enhance almost any situation, any charge, any fine you can think of. Fish and Wildlife declaration forms include the leather on your watch band.

    Don’t blow this by yelling at each other. Our government did this. They all did this. Everyone of our elected officials has a responsibility for this mess and we (the people) should be terrified enough to shout for each and every one of them to do something about it.

    I’m emotional as hell about this mess. Google the story of Diane Huang. Her nightmare began in 1999. It is only recently that plant and plant products, including wood and wood products have been added to the Lacey act.

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  20. @mark, all of the speaking in tongues here is making it hard to think: Fast & Furious, GE, UAW, Goldman Sachs. So much smoke & mirrors to cover for a simple case of fraudulent customs paperwork and a lying CEO – and an affidavit no one bothered to read. I don’t know nor care enough about the raid 2 years ago to comment, but based on the “reporting” done here and elsewhere it’s clear that I’ve come to the wrong place for an objective analysis of the facts.

    I’m not a customs agent, so I can’t issue judgement on the 2 year case-length; are you implying that customs cases of this complexity typically take less time? You certainly haven’t presented any evidence to support that fact. I do know that federal agents can request a search warrant as part of an ongoing investigation based on a thorough affidavit. That seems like a pretty basic law-enforcement procedure; and one that conservatives haven’t had any issues with until recently…

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  21. Well, at least you can admit your ignorance. The raid two years ago has produced no charges. An affidavit is not the same as pressing charges. Any simpleton who has seen an episode of law and order could tell you that.

    How long should it take for charges to be filed? Immediately when private property is confiscated. Otherwise, its called theft. In America, one is innocent (yes, even corporations are innocent) until they are proven guilty. And where do they need to be proven guilty? That’s right, in a court of law. Not in a fuckin affidavit that was used to obtain a search warrant.

    I’m moving too fast and making your head hurt again, aren’t I? Here, let me put it in shallow self absorbed examples so you can understand: I sign an affidavit saying, “I saw kiddie porn on Trizzlor’s computer.” the feds come in and confiscate your cell, laptop, and pc (or mac, I don’t discriminate). After 2 years, no charges have been pressed, and you still don’t have your property returned. You wait patiently, and nothing. Then the feds kick in your door again, and take your new cell, laptop and pc, for the same crime you still haven’t been charged with.

    But you’re just a lying pedophile, because there’s an affidavit. Way to go, fucko. And who cares about that other raid two years ago? Pfft. That’s old news. The ceo is definitely lying. That makes much more sense, because there’s an affidavit and no charges. I forgot that’s what puts criminals away. Not warrants, searches, arrests, trials, or juries. Its okay, everyone! Justice has been served! Trizzlor read an affidavit!

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  22. It’s George Bush’s fault.

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  23. Republicans aren’t going to fix this mess.

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  24. @mark. The CEO toured the conservative interview scene saying he had no idea what he’s done wrong. Yet a 10 minute search reveals a thorough affidavit that specifically outlines what the government thinks he’s done wrong. If you can’t admit that this is at best, manipulation and at worst, a flat-out lie – we’re not going to get anywhere.

    Customs agents have a different set of procedures when the case involves international shipments. That has been the law since the 1930’s and is something conservatives have been all too eager to support when it’s ICE cracking down on Mexicans. Making up analogies to situations that do not involve international trade is just more smoke. If you’re angry that the previous case is taking too long, you should provide evidence that it can be done more efficiently. If you’re angry that customs can pursue a case without bringing about charges, you should provide an alternative. Right now it just seems that you’re angry.

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  25. Well put, trizzlor. I was getting worried there was nobody out there ready to say the United States has the right to seize and keep private property and conduct investigations without filing charges for 2 years as long as it has a thorough affidavit. You are not a customs agent but you do have a sound understanding of the Constitution.

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  26. Why is Trizzlor talking about U.S. customs declarations? The Lacey Act has nothing to do with mis-declarations on customs forms. Further, customs fraud is not the allegation. U.S. customs are not even involved and it would only become involved if there were import duties involved…which they are not.

    The allegation is that importing this wood is a violation of Indian law if it was were not finished in India.

    Perverse as it sounds the problem goes away if Gibson made it’s products in India….it has nothing to do with protecting wood. The Indian law protects Indian jobs.

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  27. I have been reading about this Gibson raid of late and I am wondering why them? What are they doing that let’s say, Fender, does not do? Where do other manufacturers get their ebony wood? Do they get “finished wood” from India, so it’s okay? Has any other manufacturer been asked for comment on this case?
    Are there other countries besides Madagascar and India where this wood can be found?

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  28. Richie, Great last sentence.

    Regarding the first few comments, there are many agencies involved in this cluster f**k. The Lacey Act is the regulation that Fish and Wildlife uses to persecute importers – or people who go across state line with something they bought legally in the past. Customs and Border Patrol are required to clear each and every shipment. Further, there are only a few ports and airports in the US where these things can enter the country, and that includes carrying your guitar (under the language of the act). Homeland Security is also involved. And then there is APHIS.

    By the way, it’s not just wood that is in question. Two mm abalone side markers come under ESA (Endangered Species Act), not because they are all endangered, guitar makers use commercially farmed abalone and mother of pearl, but because everything from the sea is controlled under ESA , enforced by FWS and cleared by Customs and Border Patrol.

    Be sure when you ship a guitar across state lines that you write on the box “Contains Wildlife Products.” It isn’t illegal to have it, to use it, to sell it, but it is illegal to ship it without labeling the box. Oh.. nobody knew that? Too bad, you’ll see your guitar never and be happy if you don’t get the $100,000 fine because you “should have known.”

    What Gibson ordered and received was legal product worked in the manner required by the Indian government. It is what is used by virtually every guitar maker in the US and internationally, at least in part. From the custom builders all across the US, from Fender on the west to Martin on the east, this is how it’s done and the wood is sustainable plantation grown.

    The guitars you own are 100 percent legal, however under the language of the law as it is written now, your rights to do with your legal personal property are now changed. Those changes put every last one of us in danger of confiscation, fines and/or imprisonment and do nothing to address the problems of deforestation.

    @Jim, There are several countries where suitable rosewoods are grown. Most of the woods we use are the replacement for Brazilian rosewood which was the first to be recognized as endangered. Guitar makers endanger it, flooring and furniture and charcoal makers did it in. The most beautiful substitute was Madagascar rosewood until it came to light that the government there was lying, so most builders laid off, as did Gibson and their importer. This was before there was a law in place, this was done because it’s right.

    Cocobolo from South America, 27 varieties of rosewood in Brazil, African blackwood, Cambodian rosewood, Bolivian rosewood, Bois du rose, palisander, to name a few.

    The amusing part of this is that Indian rosewood was the back up, the safe choice, the reliable wood, the wood builders believed they would always be able to use because it’s sustainable if and until the eco regulations were sorted out. The high end customers have not been interested in the lowly stuff for a long long time, instead always looking for Brazilian rosewood replacements. When this is all over and legal trade in Indian rosewood guitar parts goes back to normal, I suspect there will be renewed interest in a lovely wood that has been out of favor.

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  29. On average, you commit 7 felonies a day. Chances are, someone can fill out an affidavit on the crimes you commit.

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  30. @mark

    I understand it must be a thorough affidavit, Mark. That would cut down on our daily number of proven crimes because even an omnipotent federal government could only produce flimsy affidavits if they had to cover all our felonies every day.

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  31. This article confirms my criticisms that this is a “good intention” ambiguous amendment gone astray as a result of bad implementation on the regulation side. Keep that in mind with the coming potential tsunami of regulation from Cass Sunstein.

    “Responsibility for enforcing Lacey, and making sure that all wood was in compliance with all of the world’s regulations, was handed to the Animal Plant Heath Inspection Service (APHIS), an arm of the U.S. Department of Agriculture.”

    “In a December 15, 2008 presentation, APHIS officials appeared overwhelmed by the new job. They said that enforcement was a low priority and it would take at least a year to develop reporting requirements and proper forms. Yet 11 months later, the Feds were at Gibson’s door with guns drawn.”

    http://ht.ly/6keYf

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  32. Well, there is a way out of Gibson’s predicament: Just move the whole Company to Mexico, or China, or Timbuctoo, and the Feds will be left at the border–waving their hand-cuffs! And then the big O can tell us how they got rid of a law-breaking company that refused to obey the conservation laws–not to mention putting a big bunch of folks out of work!
    Grab hold of the safety handles in those rail-cars!! They’ll be speeding across the border asap! And another bunch of Americans will be put out of work, by the big O and his cronies!

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  33. Is Obama anti-capitalism? lets see. Isnt it true the bailout of the auto industry was to control the kinds of cars they make and to reward the unions for cronieism,after all filing for bankruptcy would not have put them out of business,just forced them to reorganize. Isnt it true that he has imposed regulations on business so draconian that business is not expanding and merely amassing cash due to uncertainties and an anti business climate.Isnt it true there was not one job added in August? Isnt it true that his spread the wealth attitude is raping the economy of growth and discouraging innovation and new business startups? Isnt it true we now have a steady 9.1% unemployment rate?Isnt it true this man is a Marxist?

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  34. It has been said that the best time to plant a tree was 20 years ago , the next best time is today , , Instead of argueing among us , is to promote ,Rosewood and Ebony forests , … we musicians will have to pay up for the luxury of owning a guitar or piano with these exotic woods , until supply increases , , which will be some time till these new forests mature , till then a poor mans guitar will use Graphite of some thing , I would like to thank the author of this article for the fact he brought , I have been talking to friends and there is much shrouding this contraversy

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  35. Out of all the comments here about what the CEO had on his paperwork , not one of them comes from an expert. I am a luthier, I build and repair guitars for a living. Do any of you even know what a fingerboard is? I do and it’s exactly what Henry ordered, paid for , and received!
    The only thing that the AMERICAN factory had to do was cut the slots for the frets (the little metal bars that you see going across the neck) and glue them to the neck. They are universally known as fingerboard blanks! Some don’t even get the slots cut into them. So all you Barry supporters are DEAD WRONG! Way to create jobs Barry! Machine guns storming into a guitar factory? And you people are defending these actions? Do any of you libtards want to discuss Operation Fast and Furios? You know , where barry told eric to tell the atf to order mom and pop businesses to sell assault rifles to KNOWN MEXICAN DRUG CARTELS and then blamed U.S. laxed gun laws for all the murders in Mexico? Sneaky bastards would have gotten away with it too if a border patrol agent wasn’t killed with one of them and cause some atf agents conscienses to get the better of them until they turned whistle blower! WAY BIGGER SCANDAL Than Gibson using wood, Way bigger than even WATERGATE, but somehow NBC and the left controlled media are all but ignoring it and helping barry and eric to cover it up and make it go away! NO ONE got killed at Watergate! Where are all your pitchforks and torches? Is it because a Republican didn’t cause it?!?!?

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  36. Place your self in the shoes of a man looking down the barrel of an assault weapon.You have been making musical instruments .You are arrested and the musical instruments are seized.
    This dosnt bother you.This is like Fahrenheit 400 and Orwell,and the Gestapo all in one.
    If I were a Hitler youth reading about this I would be overjoyed at knowing there was an outlet for my rage and hate,and it would be sanctioned by my government.
    This is the path one takes when one is on their way straight to hell.
    Its been done before,just look at your history books-dictators rise and fall-people die,but they never stop falling for a lie when they hear it.
    It is a lie that Gibson violated a law.
    It is a lie that the Lacey Act is saving the rainforest.
    It is a lie we should not believe.
    Maestro guitar brand copy’s the Gibson ES 335 in exact detail and imports it into the USA with the exact same components ,sells it for less,and IT IS MADE IN CHINA.

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  37. No matter how you spin this, it’s surprising to me that we wonder why businesses are fleeing the U.S. to do business elsewhere. We really need to pick our battles here.

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  38. This is all stupid Gibson should be able to have the wood i am writing a speech for class about destroying this law. write a coment back to me if you agree

    Reply

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